Rush

Rock MusicThe Who biography is a story that captures all the components of exhausting work, success, dedication and tragedy which are typically associated with the larger than life traditional rock bands that dominated their era. ^ C. Smith, 101 Albums That Changed Fashionable Music (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), ISBN zero-19-537371-5 , p. 240. Dance beats appealed to a subculture of ravers, whose consumption of the occasion drug Ecstasy terrified parents who had grown up experimenting with marijuana to the sounds of rock.

^ E. Macan, Rocking the Classics: English Progressive Rock and the Counterculture (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997), ISBN zero-19-509887-0 , p. 129. ^ R. Huq, Beyond Subculture: Pop, Youth and Id in a Postcolonial World (Abingdon: Routledge, 2006), ISBN 0-415-27815-5 , p. 161.

^ B. Bradby, “Do-speak, do not-discuss: the division of the topic in girl-group music” in S. Frith and A. Goodwin, eds, On File: Rock, Pop, and the Written Phrase (Abingdon: Routledge, 1990), ISBN zero-415-05306-four , p. 341. ^ L. Starr and C. Waterman, American In style Music (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2nd edn, 2007), ISBN zero-19-530053-X , archived from the original on 17 February 2011.

^ R. Walser, Operating With the Devil: Energy, Gender, and Madness in Heavy Metal Music (Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1993), ISBN zero-8195-6260-2 , p. 3. ^ P. Auslander, Performing Glam Rock: Gender and Theatricality in Widespread Music (Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, 2006), ISBN 0-472-06868-7 , p. 34.

^ a b M. Campbell, ed., In style Music in America: and the Beat Goes on (Boston, MA: Cengage Studying, 3rd edn., 2008), ISBN 0-495-50530-7 , pp. 157-eight. The “punk rock” of the mid-1970s was a response to the perceived stagnation of the genre and a nihilistic political statement.